Home
Who We Are
Programs
Membership
Newsletter
Contact Us


AEC Independent Film Series
Spring 2006

The following films will be shown for one week each starting February 10, 2006.
Call the Bijou Theatre at 423-265-5220 for times or visit The Bijou's Web Site.

Click below for more info on these Spring 2006 Films

The Squid and the Whale
February 10-16
The Dying Gaul
March 24-30
Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World
February 17-23
Winter Passing
March 31-April 6
Paradise Now
February 24-March 2
Why We Fight
April 7-13
The Kid and I
March 3-9
The Intruder
April 14-20
Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont
March 10-16
Joyeux Noël (Merry Christmas)
April 21-27
Cache
March 17-23
Unknown White Male
April 28-May 4


The Squid and the Whale

February 10-16

USA (Rated R)
Director: Noah Baumbach

Baumbach’s semi-autobiographical family story is set in 1980s Brooklyn. The dad (Jeff Daniels) is a frustrated writer while Mom’s (Laura Linney) writing gifts are just surfacing. As their marriage is falling apart, their two sons must sort out their loyalties as they struggle with their own developing identities. Intense, but tender performances from this ensemble cast. Baumbach won the Director and Screenwriter Awards at the 2005 Sundance Festival. This film has “the power to break your heart and heal it again,” says the Los Angeles Times.

return to top

Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World

February 17-23

USA (rated PG-13)
Director: Albert Brooks

In this hilarious new film, comedian Albert Brooks gets summoned by politician/actor Fred Thompson to come to Washington D.C. to help in a new diplomatic effort to improve relations with Muslim countries. His job? Spend a month in India and Pakistan, write a 500 page report, and tell the U.S. government what makes the over 300 million Muslims in the region laugh. While Brooks isn't sure he's the man for the job, the possibility of a Medal of Freedom proves irresistable and he accepts. Albert Brooks wrote and directed this inspiring and comedic view of America's approach towards other cultures.

return to top

Paradise Now

February 24-March 2

Palestine/Rated PG-13
Director: Hany Abu-Assad

Paradise Now follows two Palestinian childhood friends who have been recruited as suicide bombers for a strike on Tel Aviv, focusing on what may be the final 48 hours of their lives. When they are intercepted at the Israeli border, a young woman who discovers their plan causes them to reconsider their actions. While filming in Palestine between real life missile attacks and raids, director Hany Abu-Assad’s ultimate challenge came when his location manager was kidnapped and the entire crew was forced to evacuate at gunpoint. The film was named Best Foreign Language Picture at the Golden Globes.

return to top

The Kid and I

March 3-9

USA (Rated PG-13)
Director: Penelope Spheeris

A wealthy father (Joe Mantegna) hires a forgotten actor (Tom Arnold) to write a pseudo-sequel to the action film “True Lies” as a vehicle for his son with cerebral palsy. The downtrodden man and the physically challenged but spirited boy become an unlikely duo, both on and off the set. Spheeris, the prolific interpreter of the boomer generation, weaves cultural fiction and fact into another precise reflection of our lives. WIth a surprisingly well-written script from Tom Arnold, the film boasts an all-star cast and some big cameo appearances.

return to top

Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont

March 10-16

United Kingdom (unrated)
Director: Dan Ireland

A graceful widow (Dame Joan Plowright), neglected by her family, moves into a London pension to live out her remaining days while trying to hold on to her dignity and independence. She bonds with the eccentric residents of the hotel during their shared meal times but remains lonely until she meets a young writer, Ludovic (Rupert Friend), who comes to her aid after a fall. Despite their age difference, the two share a love of poetry and tea time. Their friendship sparks a harmless ruse and gives Ludovic material for his novel We’re Not Allowed to Die Here. Based on a 1971 novel by Elizabeth Taylor (not the actress), the plight of the elderly is portrayed in heartrending detail.

return to top

Caché (Hidden)

March 17-23
France (Rated R)
Director: Michael Haneke

The English title “Hidden” best describes this suspense-filled drama about a couple (Daniel Auteuil and Juliette Binoche) who are terrorized by a succession of eerie video tapes that are left on their front porch. The tapes seem to indicate that someone is watching the couple yet there is no message that would tell them why. As days pass and the couple has to live their lives in the ominous shadow of being watched, the plot thickens, revealing details from the husband’s past and exposing family secrets. Without using a score, Haneke establishes a nearly unbearable level of tension, earning Best Director at the Cannes Film Festival.

return to top

The Dying Gaul
March 24-30

USA (Rated R)
Director: Craig Lucas

Playwright/screenwriter Craig Lucas (Secret Lives of Dentists, Prelude to a Kiss) makes his directorial debut with this fiercely original psychological thriller based on his play of the same name. Peter Sarsgaard stars as Robert, a fledgling screenwriter who, after multiple rejections, is finally offered a million dollars for his latest and most personal work - the raw, autobiographical story of the death of his lover. Robert is pulled into a triangle with Jeffrey and his wife (Patricia Clarkson), setting off a dangerous series of deceptions, confessions, lies, and betrayals.
___________________________________________________________

return to top

Winter Passing

March 31-April 6

USA (Rated R)
Director: Adam Rapp

In his first feature film, veteran playwright Adam Rapp tells the story of an unhappy stage actress, Reese (played by Zooey Deschanel) in New York City. Following her
mother’s death, Reese is offered a $100,000 book deal based upon the love letters written between her novelist parents. She returns home to wintry Michigan to get the letters and discovers that her father (Ed Harris) is more incapacitated than she expected, and has some oddball characters (Will Farrell and Amelia Warner) living with him. As the visit unfolds, Reese is forced to confront her painful, unresolved childhood; her grief over her mother’s death; her father’s frailty; and the motives of the peculiar live-ins, all at once.

return to top

Why We Fight
April 7-13

USA (unrated)
Director: Eugene Jarecki

A lively, but balanced look at the effect war policy and planning has on our society and our institutions. In 1961, as President Dwight D. Eisenhower was leaving office, he gave a farewell speech predicting the dangerous rise of the “military-industrial complex.” Ike’s son and granddaughter weigh in, as do America’s leading neo-cons, 9/11 survivors, Senators and foreign policy experts. The film title comes from the propaganda films that director Frank Capra made for the State Department during WWII. This unflinching look at the American war machine won the Best American Documentary prize at the 2005 Sundance Film Festival.

return to top

The Intruder

April 14-20

France (unrated)
Director: Claire Denis
In French, Russian, Korean, English and Tahitian, with English subtitles

Admirers of Claire Denis (Beau Travail, Chocolat) should take this fleeting opportunity to see her latest film on the big screen. Shot in ravishing CinemaScope by the great Agnès Godard, this intensely physical film takes viewers from the French Alps via Korea to a mesmerizing vision of the Pacific in all its immense heaving blueness. Yet one can never be certain how real these settings are for Louis, the film’s central and only significant character, played by Michel Subor. Louis scours the world for an illegal heart transplant and the son he left behind in the South Seas. Inspired by philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy’s autobiographical reflection on his transplant, Denis conjures notions of intrusion on many levels: house-breaking, border crossing, colonization, sex, a knifing, and the invading heart itself.

return to top

Joyeux Noël (Merry Christmas)
April 21-27

France/Germany/United Kingdom (unrated)
Director: Christian Carion

Based on a true story, the film recreates one Christmas Eve during WWI when a few men did the unthinkable. Leaving their rifles on the ground, they crossed the trenches to shake hands and exchange cigarettes, chocolates, and holiday cheer with their enemies. Starring Diane Kruger, Benjamin Furmann, Guillaume Canet, and Gary Lewis.

return to top

Unknown White Male

April 28 - May 4

United Kingdom (unrated)
Director: Rupert Murray

Doug Bruce woke up one day in Coney Island with no memory of any day of his life. After turning himself in to the police, he was sent off to a psychiatric hospital and eventually rescued by a friend. This documentary follows Doug in the hours and months following his amnesia, as he tries to piece his life back together and discover the world anew...re-learning the streets around his apartment, re-meeting his family, re-learning the history of the world and what it feels like to swim in the ocean. It's an overwhelming voyage of discovery as Doug discovers art, music, movies, and the taste of every kind of different food, and much of it was filmed by Doug himself who started recording just one week after the amnesia..

return to top



 

 

 











     









Arts & Education Council | 3069 South Broad Street Suite 2, Chattanooga, TN 37408
Email | Phone: (423) 267-1218 | Fax: 423-267-1018

 

     Tennessee Arts Commission